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NEWS
Carnegie Institution of Washington
09 Sep 2014

Washington, D.C.—A team of scientists led by Carnegie’s Jacqueline Faherty has discovered the first evidence of water ice clouds on an object outside of our own Solar System. Water ice clouds exist on our own gas giant planets–Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune–but have not been seen outside of the planets orbiting our Sun until now. […]

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Washington, D.C.—A team of scientists led by Carnegie’s Jacqueline Faherty has discovered the first evidence of water ice clouds on an object outside of our own Solar System. Water ice clouds exist on our own gas giant planets–Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune–but have not been seen outside of the planets orbiting our Sun until now. Their findings are published by The Astrophysical Journal Letters. At the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile, Faherty, along with a team including Carnegie’s Andrew Monson, used the FourStar near infrared camera to detect the coldest brown dwarf ever characterized. Their findings are the result of 151 images taken over three nights and combined. The object, named WISE J085510.83-071442.5, or W0855, was first seen by NASA’s Wide-Field Infrared Explorer mission and published earlier this year. But it was not known if it could be detected by Earth-based facilities.

“This was a battle at the telescope to get the detection,” said Faherty.

Chris Tinney, an Astronomer at the Australian Centre for Astrobiology, UNSW Australia and co-author on the result stated: “This is a great result. This object is so faint and it’s exciting to be the first people to detect it with a telescope on the ground.”

Brown dwarfs aren’t quite very small stars, but they aren’t quite giant planets either. They are too small to sustain the hydrogen fusion process that fuels stars. Their temperatures can range from nearly as hot as a star to as cool as a planet, and their masses also range between star-like and giant planet-like. They are of particular interest to scientists because they offer clues to star-formation processes.  They also overlap with the temperatures of planets, but are much easier to study since they are commonly found in isolation.W0855 is the fourth-closest system to our own Sun, practically a next-door neighbor in astronomical distances. A comparison of the team’s near-infrared images of W0855 with models for predicting the atmospheric content of brown dwarfs showed evidence of frozen clouds of sulfide and water. “Ice clouds are predicted to be very important in the atmospheres of planets beyond our Solar System, but they’ve never been observed outside of it before now,” Faherty said. The paper’s other co-author is Andrew Skemer of the University of Arizona.

NEWS
NEW YORK TIMES
18 Feb 2015

New York Times The Metropolitan Opera said on Wednesday that it would redouble its efforts to attract new audiences to the opera next season with six new productions, a star-filled roster and new initiatives, including one that will offer half-priced tickets to children during the holidays and another to court young professionals with later curtain […]

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New York Times

The Metropolitan Opera said on Wednesday that it would redouble its efforts to attract new audiences to the opera next season with six new productions, a star-filled roster and new initiatives, including one that will offer half-priced tickets to children during the holidays and another to court young professionals with later curtain times, discounts and social events.

“The future of opera relies upon bringing new audiences in, as we all know,” Peter Gelb, the Met’s general manager, said in an interview. “Ultimately, no matter what the economics are, how daunting they are, or how successful we are in fund-raising, at the end of the day it’s all about having an audience.”

While the initiatives are aimed at newcomers, the season should offer plenty to interest regular operagoers. Nina Stemme, the acclaimed Swedish dramatic soprano whose New York appearances have been few and far between, will return to the Met next season to sing the title roles in a new production of Strauss’s “Elektra” and a revival of Puccini’s “Turandot.”

The star tenor Jonas Kaufmann and the soprano Kristine Opolais will perform in a new production of Puccini’s “Manon Lescaut” directed by Richard Eyre. James Levine, the Met’s music director, will conduct a new production of Berg’s “Lulu,” which he described in an interview as “an inspired work, from beginning to end.” The production will be staged by the South African artist William Kentridge, who did the Met’s innovative production of “The Nose.”

And, reprising a feat that Beverly Sills was famous for, Sondra Radvanovsky will sing all three queens in Donizetti’s so-called Tudor trilogy next season. She will sing the title roles in revivals of “Anna Bolena” and “Maria Stuarda” and then, when the Met brings “Roberto Devereux” to its stage for the first time in a new David McVicar production, she will perform the role of Elizabeth I, who, unlike the other two queens, manages to keep her head.

Two more new productions will round out the season: The Met will stage its first production of Bizet’s “Les Pêcheurs de Perles” (The Pearl Fishers) since 1916. It will be directed by Penny Woolcock; conducted by Gianandrea Noseda; and star Diana Damrau, Matthew Polenzani and Mariusz Kwiecien. (Mr. Gelb noted that the last tenor to sing the role Mr. Polenzani is singing was Enrico Caruso. “Hopefully there’s been enough time in between,” he said.)

And the Met will open its season with a new production of Verdi’s “Otello” directed by Bartlett Sher; conducted by Yannick Nézet-Séguin; and starring Sonya Yoncheva, who had several star-making turns this season, as Desdemona, and Aleksandrs Antonenko in the title role.

Some of the big moments of the season will be in revivals: Anna Netrebko, who made a splash this year in Verdi’s “Macbeth,” will sing Leonora in Verdi’s “Il Trovatore” for the first time at the Met. She will make her New York recital debut with a solo concert on Feb. 28, 2016.

 

The Met, which has been struggling financially and at the box office in recent seasons — it ran a $22 million deficit last year — announced a series of steps to court new audiences.

Children under 18 will be able to receive half-price tickets in any section of the house between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Eve, when purchased with a full-priced ticket.

A new program called “Fridays Under Forty” will offer tickets on selected Friday nights to people under 40 for $60 and $100 and move the curtain time back to 8 p.m., from its usual 7:30 p.m., to accommodate young professionals who work long hours.

And the Met plans to build on its popular holiday presentations aimed at families by adding one for grown-ups. So in addition to reviving an abridged, English-language revival of Rossini’s “The Barber of Seville” aimed at children, starring Isabel Leonard as Rosina, the Met will add one for adults: a streamlined revival of Johann Strauss’s “Die Fledermaus,” conducted, for his first time, by Mr. Levine.

The average ticket price will increase by 1 percent to $160, the Met said. Tickets will range in price from $25 to $480, with 36 percent of the roughly 900,000 tickets available next season for under $100, and more than half available for under $150.

Mr. Levine is to conduct five operas next season. In addition to “Lulu” and “Die Fledermaus,” he will conduct Verdi’s “Simon Boccanegra” with Plácido Domingo in the title role; Mozart’s “Die Entführung aus dem Serail”; and Wagner’s “Tannhäuser” starring Johan Botha, Peter Mattei, Eva-Maria Westbroek and Michelle DeYoung.

There are no contemporary works next season, but the Met, which has made a greater priority of new works in recent years, announced that it had commissioned a new opera by Nico Muhly, the composer of “Two Boys.” Mr. Muhly will write “Marnie,” based on the 1961 Winston Graham novel that was adapted for the screen by Alfred Hitchcock, and which is scheduled to come to the Met’s stage, in a production directed by Michael Mayer, in the 2019-20 season.

“It does everything that you want an opera to do, really,” Mr. Muhly said of the book. “It’s really, really dark.”